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Ohio Deeds: Quitclaim Deeds

A quitclaim deed is a legal instrument which is used to transfer interest in real property. The entity transferring its interest is called the grantor, and when the quitclaim deed is properly completed and executed, it transfers any interest the grantor has in the property to a recipient, called the grantee. Unlike most other property deeds, a quitclaim deed contains no title covenant and thus offers the grantee no warranty as to the status of the property title.

Because of this lack of warranty, quitclaim deeds are most often used to transfer property between family members, as gifts, placing personal property into a business entity (and vice versa) or in other special or unique circumstances. An example use for a quitclaim deed is in divorce, whereby one spouse terminates any interest in the jointly owned marital home, thereby granting the receiving spouse full rights to the property. 

The ease at which the quitclaim deed can be executed (it requires little more than both parties signing the document and having it notarized where required, and filed with the appropriate governmental agency with the proper fees paid) is partly to blame for the "quick claim" misnomer associated with the deed.

Please also see the Franklin County Deeds tab of this guide for information about the County Auditor and Recorder's Offices and their role in transfer and recording of real estate.

How to fill out the deed forms from the Franklin County Law Library: 

1) Read the entire form carefully. You will get a good idea of what goes in each blank by reading what comes before and after the blank.

2) Enter all the names of the current owners of the property as the "first party" on the deed. These are the grantors.

3) Enter all the names of the persons you want to be owners of the property as the "second party" on the deed. These are grantees. Note: if you are adding a name to the deed, you list the current owner and the new owner both as "second party".

4) In the blank asking for the described parcel of land, enter the legal description of the property from the prior deed. You can obtain a clean cpy of the legal description from the Franklin County Recorder's Office.  You can then label the legal description "Exhibit A" and write "See Attached Exhibit A" in the blank. (You cannot just attach the entire prior deed because conveyance standards prohibit multiple grantor/grantee clauses in one deed.)

5) Each grantor must sign the deed in front of a notary public. There is a notary at the Franklin County Auditor's Office. Each deed that transfers real estate must start the process at the Auditor's Office.

6) The deed is filed at the Franklin County Recorder's Office.

Franklin County Auditor's Office

Franklin County Auditor

373 S. High St., 19th Floor
Columbus, Ohio 43215
614-525-4663
email: AuditorStinziano@franklincountyohio.gov

Office Hours
Monday through Friday
8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Documents that transfer real estate must start the transfer process with the Franklin County Auditor because DTE 100 or DTE 100EX must be completed. If a homestead exemption is requested, then DTE 101 must also be completed.